Common Ground Relief

In a heated debate among activists, someone told Malik: “what you have to do is to find a “common ground.” Hence sprang the name of an organization that became so effective and respectable, that most of the aid to the affected – even the official help –, started to flow through them.

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New Orleans (NOLA)

Here the are some snapshot of our days in New Orleans, one of the oldest and most European-African cities in the world. Thanks, Jonathan and Lesley, for your infinite hospitality and the day-night tours!

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Working class heroes

In one of the most conservative states of the U.S.A., Latino workers are betting on community organization and education to reclaim their rights. The bronze race is at the front of new conquests, in a land that was taken away from Mexico at the end of the 19th century.

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Southwest Workers Union

On the limits of one of the poorest neighborhoods of San Antonio, Texas, there is a mural in honor to a foundation of the United States economy: the Latino workers. The images of the “working class heroes” have an expression written next to them: “A hurricane of change is made up of small things, like the beating of a butterfly’s wings”. And what better phrase to define the 27 year struggle of the Southwest Workers Union, an organization born out of the protests against the Vietnam War, that resulted in one of the most spirited unions in southern United States.

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San Antonio, the color of hope

In San Antonio, Texas, a whim from destiny lead us to discover a social struggle that knows no boundaries. It was about Esperanza Peace & Justice Center, an NGO that seeks to defend the rights of women and the Mexican-American community through art and culture. Their mission: to build bonds between people and organizations in order to promote an exchange of ideas, education, and citizen empowerment.

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Esperanza Peace & Justice

In San Antonio, Texas, without even wanting, we met tireless fighters who give their lives in order to protect and reclaim the rights of the most vulnerable communities of this border city: the women, the undocumented, the Latino workers, the race minorities. Thanks to their activism, the government and the companies have had to back down from projects that threaten the city’s cultural heritage or violate the most unprotected sectors.

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(Not) Welcome to the USA

In order to go from Mexico to the United States, one must pass through a Kafkan labyrinth that unfolds the absurdity of North-American migratory politics. A film packed with dreadful invaders and paladins in uniform, struggling in a swamp overflowing with paranoia and lacking in reason.

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