Common Ground Relief

In a heated debate among activists, someone told Malik: “what you have to do is to find a “common ground.” Hence sprang the name of an organization that became so effective and respectable, that most of the aid to the affected – even the official help –, started to flow through them.

View photos →

New Orleans (NOLA)

Here the are some snapshot of our days in New Orleans, one of the oldest and most European-African cities in the world. Thanks, Jonathan and Lesley, for your infinite hospitality and the day-night tours!

View photos →

Southwest Workers Union

On the limits of one of the poorest neighborhoods of San Antonio, Texas, there is a mural in honor to a foundation of the United States economy: the Latino workers. The images of the “working class heroes” have an expression written next to them: “A hurricane of change is made up of small things, like the beating of a butterfly’s wings”. And what better phrase to define the 27 year struggle of the Southwest Workers Union, an organization born out of the protests against the Vietnam War, that resulted in one of the most spirited unions in southern United States.

View photos →

Esperanza Peace & Justice

In San Antonio, Texas, without even wanting, we met tireless fighters who give their lives in order to protect and reclaim the rights of the most vulnerable communities of this border city: the women, the undocumented, the Latino workers, the race minorities. Thanks to their activism, the government and the companies have had to back down from projects that threaten the city’s cultural heritage or violate the most unprotected sectors.

View photos →

The Chief of Chiefs

On our way north from Coahuila, we were lucky enough to meet up with the Kikapoo tribe and its grand chief Chakoka Anico Manta, a few months before he died. It was very moving to share an intimate interview with the moral leader of «those who walk the earth». Soon, you’ll be able to read the chronicle. Kepishe, chief, au nenia («Thank you, chief, see you soon!»)

View photos →

Dreamctacher in Sabinas

Lights, camera, action! Here there are some moments of Dreamcatcher Cabaret, that we had the pleasure of sharing with the Palacios family, in Sabinas, Coahuila, just before crossing the border to United States. Special thanks to Tadeo, Iza, aunts and uncles for their kindness and the help with the show and fixing Adelita. Long live the north!

View photos →

Migrant Home of Saltillo

Pictures of our visit to the Migrant’s House in Saltillo, where we had the opportunity to share our show Atrapasueños Cabaret (Dreamcatcher Cabaret) with nearly 300 Latin brothers and sisters travelling north in search of a better life. We thank Eduardo Calderón’s management, and the attentions of Father Pedro Pantoja and Sister Lupita, as well as all Frontera con Justicia (Border with Justice) collaborators.

View photos →

Dreamcatcher Cabaret

Find here some pictures of Cabaret Atrapasueños, taken by “Beto” Puente. Besides being one of Pato Che’s best friends, he is also the official photographer for the governor of the state of Coahuila. We want to thank from the bottom of our hearts all our family and friends, as well as the fabulous audience who shared with us a magical night.

View photos →

Naissance, the art of childbirth

Polo a Polo was lucky enough to have the opportunity to film the important work of Karla González, who fights for a more dignified childbirth. She does so through Naissance, her center of psychological prevention and childbirth activation. On top of giving classes of water therapy, the center organizes classes of parental awareness and workshops of breast-feeding and weaning. Its mission: inform the women of Coahuila state of their right to give birth in full knowledge and safety.

View photos →

The trail of corn

The agronomical engineer Gustavo Burciaga, director of the Mexican Institute of Corn at the Agrarian Autonomous University of Antonio (UAAAN) talked to Polo a Polo about the alternatives to increase corn production, without the use of transgenics.

View photos →